Hernandez Case Shows Hypocrisy of Race Baiters

As many now know, former New England Patriots’ tight end Aaron Hernandez has been found guilty of first degree murder, and sentenced to life in prison without parole. Hernandez was tried in a Massachusetts courtroom for the 2013 killing of Odin Lloyd, a onetime friend of his. Those familiar with the case know that Lloyd was a former semi-pro football player for the Boston Bandits. He was also black. Hernandez is of mixed-race heritage since his father is of Puerto Rican ancestry and his mother’s ancestry is Italian.

If the races involved in this killing are giving you a flashback, there’s probably a good reason. The entire country was swept up in the 2012 killing of black teenager Trayvon Martin by the half-white, half-Peruvian George Zimmerman. The civil rights establishment and other black advocacy groups were up in arms over the killing, and rushing to paint it as an example of extreme racial prejudice and profiling. When Zimmerman was ultimately found not guilty, it caused riots, marches and other displays of public outcry.

Despite these similarities, Hernandez’s killing of Lloyd was not met with the same public outrage from the usual suspects in the race baiting crowd. But why not? As with Martin-Zimmerman, there is a half-white, half-Hispanic man accused of murdering a black person. Why wasn’t Hernandez branded the full-fledged racist that Zimmerman was accused of being?

Sadly, the answer to this question can be answered with the associations Hernandez had made by the time of the murder. Even though Hernandez wasn’t black at all, many of his friends have been. In fact, two men that were also arrested for Lloyd’s death and charged with his murder, Carlos Ortiz and Ernest Wallace, are black. Hernandez’s fiancé, Shayanna Jenkins, is also black. Proving that a man with these kinds of close relationships with blacks was racially motivated to kill a black person would be a much tougher sell for the race hustlers in American society, rather than portraying that a neighborhood watch volunteer in a gated community was racially motivated in killing someone black. Thus, the Hernandez case, despite the publicity it got, was largely left alone by the people who screamed about the supposed racism of George Zimmerman.

Of course, this isn’t a surprise to most of us that follow the typical patterns of the race-baiting black leadership in America. Over 90% of the time that a black person is killed in this country, they are killed by another black person. But highlighting those cases would disrupt the narrative of the white oppressor vs. the black victim that these leaders want so desperately to promote. Not seeing blacks as victims of white oppression, but as victims of problems with their own communities and culture, embraces a responsibility that race baiters had always rejected. Therefore, the rejection of this responsibility would cause the assumption of it to automatically fall to whites rather than blacks. This is the mindset that the civil rights establishment must keep afloat today.

Ultimately, the lack of attention paid to the Hernandez trial by the black leadership was the result of the façade that must continue to be portrayed. Despite Hernandez not possessing a drop of black blood in his body, calling attention to the races involved in Lloyd’s killing would also call attention to the involvement of his two black co-conspirators. As a result, the entire paradigm of white oppressors and black victims would be challenged to an extent that the modern-day civil rights leaders would not be comfortable with. Since Zimmerman had no blacks involved with him in the altercation and eventual killing of Martin, portraying blacks and whites (or even mixed-raced non-blacks) in this manner was of no obstacle for those who are so eager to do it.

The Hernandez-Lloyd and Zimmerman-Martin cases show that even the slightest disruption to the race-baiter’s narrative can cause vastly different responses. The mere involvement of black people in Lloyd’s killing was enough to create a roadblock to his being the poster child for black victimhood that was so easily ascribed to Martin. If all black lives truly matter (as the newly popular saying goes), then the ending of Odin Lloyd’s life should have brought the same passion for justice as the death of Trayvon Martin. But sadly, thanks to politically correct agendas, it most certainly did not.