Comparing the Two Victories of Trump and the Cubs

When people look back on the month of November in 2016, they will likely cite two momentous events that occurred in American culture. One was the shocking victory of Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton to become the 45th President of the United States. The other was the victory of the Chicago Cubs in the World Series to end their 108 year title drought. Both of these things happened within a week of one another.

There are several similarities between the victories of both Trump and the Cubs. Both involved a result so astonishing that many people couldn’t believe what had happened. Both took fans of opposing sides through emotional rollercoasters on the way to the final result. Both will no doubt cause people to forever remember where they were when the victor in the two contests ultimately prevailed.

But any time when there are comparative similarities, there will also be inevitable differences. The Cubs’ epic World Series victory is not as parallel to Trump’s upset win as many have thought. This doesn’t mean that we can’t all stand in collective amazement at both. But let’s also understand what makes the two legendary wins so unlike one another.

1. The hate factor.

It’s certainly not accurate to say that no one hates either the Cubs or the Indians. All teams have rivals who despise them. The Cubs have the arch nemesis St. Louis Cardinals and the crosstown White Sox on the South Side. The Indians have their rivals within the American League Central where there is no love lost as well. But considering the length of time since each team’s last championship (1908 for the Cubs, 1948 for the Indians), it’s harder for sports fans in general to summon intense hatred for teams who haven’t won in so long.

Meanwhile, the candidates put forward by the Republican and Democratic parties were statistically the most hated presidential candidates in American history. Usually a president actually has to serve a four year term to be unlikeable with a significant portion of the public. But Clinton and Trump were both more unpopular having never served as president than any previous president at the four year mark. Not the kind of record you want to own.

2. One was an upset, the other was not.

Many have cited how the Cubs were big underdogs after falling down three games to one to the Indians in the World Series. But this only makes the North Siders strongly disfavored if you cite a specific time after a specific game that put them in a 3-1 hole. Aside from this brief time, no one had better odds of winning the 2016 World Series than the Cubs. They were widely considered to be the best team in baseball the entire season and ended the regular season with the game’s best record.

Compare this with The Donald and a stark difference emerges. Trump’s candidacy was largely considered to be a joke in many circles. Political pundits and experts were constantly predicting that he couldn’t sustain the momentum that caused him to surge to frontrunner status. His election astonished people because of how it flew in the face of so many pollsters and political scientists who attempt to forecast electoral outcomes.

3. The Cubs were long suffering, Trump was not.

The reason Chicago’s win was so memorable was because of how long they waited to finally get to the top of the baseball world. They had failed for so many years that it had seemed like the moment would never happen. Donald Trump, however, had no such long term suffering. Although he had entertained the idea of running for president in the past, this election marked the first time he had ever taken the plunge. A sports team equivalent of the Trump’s victory would be something along the lines of the 1997 Marlins, 2000 Ravens or 2001 Diamondbacks all winning championships within the first five seasons of their existences.

So for those reasons (and likely many more), the Trump victory and the Cubs victory are not as similar as some may think. They will, however, be forever linked by the fact that they both happened in relative succession to one another. The high emotions surrounding both events will likely also be prevalent in people’s memories for quite some time. But look closer and the pronounced differences will be there as well.