Bill Simmons’ “Ringer” Site Goes Soft on Socialism, Goes Hard After Pro-Lifers

It should be no surprise that sports writer Bill Simmons would promote the writing of those who lean to the political left. After all, the former ESPN personality did hire liberal pundit (and writer for Esquire) Charles P. Pierce for his former website “Grantland.” But since leaving ESPN, Simmons has founded a new website called “The Ringer.” Among the topics discussed are sports (of course), television, movies, music and politics. On the site’s “politics” page, no indication is made as to what viewpoint or angle they want to represent. But a quick browsing of the article headlines should make it pretty obvious as to what agenda they are trying to push.

That agenda becomes remarkably clear in two of their recent articles. One is titled “Is the Socialism Wave for Real?” It highlights the rise of socialist New York congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The other is titled “‘Roe v. Wade’ and the Ugly Future of the Movies.” It discusses the upcoming movie about the landmark case. From the articles’ titles, one could conclude a bias right off the bat. Further examining the articles makes that bias become all the more obvious.

In exploring the new “fad” of socialism, author Justin Charity describes the critics of Ocasio-Cortez as being “alarmist to a fault.” Of course, there’s no mention of any kind of alarmism that might lead someone to embrace socialism. Charity then goes on to describe this brand of socialism as “a framework in which large tax revenues support robust public services, welfare resources, and labor unions.” He makes it sound so welcoming, doesn’t he? Left out of this description is the fact that tax revenues hover around 20% of GDP regardless of tax structure, the welfare state has crippled entire generations of Americans and labor unions (contrary to what is typically taught in public schools) were not responsible for raising wages, creating a 40 hour work week or ending child labor. The harsh reality is that socialism has crushed innovation and kept droves of individuals in poverty rather than providing an escape from it.

But the “socialism” write up wasn’t the only time last month that Charity had an article with a left wing bias published by the site. Eight days earlier, he had put forward a piece discussing the upcoming pro-life movie “Roe v. Wade.” The article’s subtitle poses the question “Is a polarized country ready for far-right cinema?” Implied is the accusation that someone has to be “far right” to be pro-life or favor the overturning of Roe. Charity continues to trash the film (and by extension, the anti-abortion movement) by saying:

“The film reinforces lies that have been told over and over,” one potential investor told The Hollywood Reporter in a story published last week. “All the weird fake news about abortion is in there. All stuff that is easily debunked.” The script also includes a scene in which the birth control activist Margaret Sanger, on her deathbed, vows to “exterminate the Negro population” through legalized abortion.”

What’s going on here is a rather uncreative bait and switch. Nowhere in the article is any of this “fake news” actually cited. If it’s so easily debunked, why doesn’t Charity do so in this writing? He then describes the deathbed scene, implying that this is a complete falsehood. While this claim being made from her deathbed may be a stretch, Sanger did indeed view certain races of people as inferior and saw abortion as a way to limit the number of children those races would have. Rather than being easily debunked, Sanger’s racism is actually quite easy to prove.

So these two articles, in addition to others on The Ringer site that deal with politics, have a clear agenda and ideology that they wish to promote. But they aren’t thought provoking or objective toward politics or truth. Rather, they conveniently omit details and give flowery visions of ideologies which they are sympathetic toward but don’t actually produce their alleged results. Perhaps in the future the site can provide a more accurate assessment of the things they both agree and disagree with.